For Your Aging Dog

Will a Dog Wheelchair Work For My Older Dog?

There is no straight answer to this question, as every dog has a different disposition, in a different health state, and at different levels of strength and motivation.

However, thousands of dogs are living quality lives all around the world in dog wheelchairs. Fortunately, for you and your dog, we will refund you 80% of your money if you decide that our dog wheelchair is not a good choice for your dog. Return Policy. With that said, we have a less than 1% return rate on our wheelchairs, usually due to a dog’s passing before they can use the wheelchair within the 20 day trial period. So we are very confident to say that a dog wheelchair is a good choice for any dog that fits a proper evaluation. Again, please make an honest evaluation of your dog’s status.

You and your older dog can still have fun together and share many more memories with the help of a dog wheelchair. As a matter of fact, over 60% of our clients are over the age of 8. Older dogs need exercise as much or more as a younger dog. A dog wheelchair can help keep muscles toned, keep his or her body trim, and his or her joints protected.

If you want a little more time, perhaps years, with your older dog that has a condition that requires a wheelchair, the Ruff Rollin’ design will give you that chance. The Ruff Rollin’ wheelchair has given many dogs a new lease on life, a higher quality of life, and has even helped dogs come back to walking after all hope had gone. Read Bailey’s story here. She is an 11 year old Rottweiler that was diagnosed with Spondylosis. After her pain was managed, she was placed in a wheelchair, and six months later, no longer needs the wheelchair.

 

 

How long does it take for dog to adapt to a wheelchair?

 

It can take anywhere from two minutes to two weeks for a dog to adapt to a wheelchair. We personally have found that older dogs take to a wheelchair a little quicker than a younger dog. Perhaps, their intelligence and instinct allows them to accept that this might be the only choice they have for mobility.

I like to give tips to owners to help their dog adapt to his or her wheelchair. Here are a few:

Treats help of course, but keep it to a minimum if it takes longer than a few days to get your dog moving. Little dogs like Dachshunds and Corgies can gain weight quickly, which can lead to more injury. Take your dog to his or her favorite dog park or favorite play area. Other dogs and toys can be a great distraction from this weird object that is now part of their body! Keep trying! One of our clients, although a young dog, took almost two months to adapt to his wheelchair. He is now happy and confident and uses his wheelchair on a daily basis. Read Bean’s story here.

 

In addition, if your dog has been inactive for a long period of time (longer than a couple weeks, you will want to introduce a wheelchair to him or her slowly. An older dog aims to please, and can become overstrained easily. Start with ten minutes at a time, a few times a day, and work up from there.

 

 

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Latest News:
July 23rd, 2014

Are you following us on Pinterest? Pin your favorite photos, share with your friends, pin and re-pin Ruff Rollin’ on Pinterest

July 16th, 2014

When asked “WHY DO YOU DO WHAT YOU DO?”   I say “I GET TO ADD THE SPARKLE BACK!”   “If I could have taken a picture of the sparkle in my dog (GSDX) Mindy’s eyes when she realized that those wheels where giving her the freedom to move, run and play ball again, it would have said it all! She had become depressed because of her Degenerative Myelopathy and was not able to chase squirrels or play ball anymore and Ruff Rollin’ changed all that for her. She was sick for 1.5years with DM and she used her wheels [... more]

July 10th, 2014

All of our Rear Support Wheelchairs are convertible into a Full Support Design. The typical case where this might happen is with a progressive disease such as degenerative myelopathy.   Degenerative myelopathy of dogs is a slowly progressive, non-inflammatory, and painless, degeneration of the myelin sheath that surrounds the spinal cord. It is most commonly seen in German Shepherds and Welsh Corgis, although is occasionally recognized in other breeds such as Boxers The cause is unknown, although genetic factors are suspected.   The early onset usually occurs later than age 5 and usually begins with a slight knuckling over of the rear feet. You [... more]

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